script

text fragments in their variety

 

After we saw what there was to see
we went off to buy souvenirs, and my father
waited by the car and smoked. He didn’t need
a lot of things to remind him where he’d been.
Why do you want so much stuff?
he might have asked us. “Oh, Ed,” I can hear
my mother saying, as if that took care of it.

After she died I don’t think he felt any reason
to go back through all those postcards, not to mention
the glossy booklets about the Singing Tower
and the Alligator Farm, the painted ashtrays
and lucite paperweights, everything we carried home
and found a place for, then put away
in boxes, then shoved far back in our closets.

He’d always let my mother keep track of the past,
and when she was gone—why should that change?
Why did I want him to need what he’d never needed?
I can see him leaning against our yellow Chrysler
in some parking lot in Florida or Maine.
It’s a beautiful cloudless day. He glances at his watch,
lights another cigarette, looks up at the sky.

“After We Saw What There Was to See” by Lawrence Raab, from The History of Forgetting. © Penguin Poets, 2009.

 

The door swings open,
you look in.
It’s dark in there,
most likely spiders:
nothing you want.
You feel scared.
The door swings closed.

The full moon shines,
it’s full of delicious juice;
you buy a purse,
the dance is nice.
The door opens
And swings closed so quickly
you don’t notice.

The sun comes out,
you have swift breakfasts
with your husband, who is still thin;
you wash the dishes,
you love your children,
you read a book,
you go to the movies.
It rains moderately.

The door swings open,
you look in:
why does this keep happening now?
Is there a secret?
The door swings closed.

The snow falls,
you clear the walk while breathing heavily;
it’s not as easy as once.
Your children telephone sometimes.
The roof needs fixing.
You keep yourself busy.
The spring arrives.

The door swings open:
it’s dark in there,
with many steps going down.
But what is that shining?
Is it water?
The door swings closed.

The dog has died.
This happened before.
You got another; not this time though.
Where is your husband?
You gave up the garden.
It became too much.
At night there are blankets;
nonetheless you are wakeful.

The door swings open:
O god of hinges,
god of long voyages,
you have kept faith.
It’s dark in there.
You confide yourself to the darkness
You step in.
The door swings closed.

- Margaret Atwood

 

Four men entered paradise [pardes] — Ben Azzai, Ben Zoma, Acher [that is, Elisha], and Akiba.

Ben Azzai looked and died;

Ben Zoma looked and went mad;

Acher destroyed the roots;

Akiba entered in peace and departed in peace.

—-

See Abraham Joshua Heschel…

 

The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
The ancient tradition that the world will be consumed in fire at the end of six thousand years is true, as I have heard from Hell.
For the cherub with his flaming sword is hereby commanded to leave his guard at the tree of life, and when he does, the whole creation will be consumed and appear infinite and holy whereas it now appears finite & corrupt.
This will come to pass by an improvement of sensual enjoyment.
But first the notion that man has a body distinct from his soul is to be expunged; this I shall do, by printing in the infernal method, by corrosives, which in Hell are salutary and medicinal, melting apparent surfaces away, and displaying the infinite which was hid.
If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, infinite.
For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro’ narow chinks of his cavern.

Be here now

 ephemera, script  Comments Off
Nov 042009
 

Be here now. Later, be somewhere else. In fact you might as well head over there right from the start.

 

The Diameter of the Bomb

The diameter of the bomb was thirty centimeters
and the diameter of its effective range about seven meters,
with four dead and eleven wounded.
And around these, in a larger circle
of pain and time, two hospitals are scattered
and one graveyard. But the young woman
who was buried in the city she came from,
at a distance of more than a hundred kilometers,
enlarges the circle considerably,
and the solitary man mourning her death
at the distant shores of a country far across the sea
includes the entire world in the circle.
And I won’t even mention the crying of orphans
that reaches up to the throne of God and
beyond, making
a circle with no end and no God.

– Yehuda Amichai

Oct 072009
 

Reb Shimon comes to the Rabbi and says “I want to build a perfect Sukah, exactly as the Talmud says. Tell me what to do.” The Rabbi strokes his beard, opens the Talmud, and begins to write. He hands Shimon the instructions. Shimon hurries home, follows the instructions to the letter, and just as he attaches the last piece the entire structure collapses in a pile of rubble and dust. In tears and anger he returns and says “Rabbi, I followed the Talmud’s instructions exactly and just when I finish, the entire Sukah collapses in a pile of rubble and dust!” The Rabbi strokes his beard, opens the Talmud, and begins to read again. “Yes”, says the Rabbi, “Rashi makes the very same comment.”

Oct 052009
 

…said Emerson.